Research—pdqlover

 

Living in a Household with a Disabled Sibling

Parents have total obligations to give to their child, a child has no obligations to their parents unless negotiated between the two. A parent and child negotiation may take place when the child is old enough to do chorus for their parents and in return the child may earn allowance. When raising a child with disabilities it can be different the parents still have all obligations of caring for the child but will the disabled child ever have a negotiation with their parents to have obligations of their own? To further explain, in a morden day family when the parents get elderly and needs care the children step in and try their best to provide care to their parents or they choose other options if necessary in most situations. In some situations a family could have a disabled child who is the only child. What happens when those parents get elderly and need care and the disabled child is not able to provide it. Another question is what happens to the disabled child who needs to be cared for?  Yes, there are plenty of other options that can be put into place but what if that is not the families wishes. The responsibilities extend to other family members such as aunt’s, uncles and cousins. This topic can be very touchy but I wanted to share a similar families situation to mine and find out more information on families who are also taking care of a disabled child by research.

Here is a view of a four member house hold that includes one child that is disabled, very similar to my own. Two patents and two children and one child is disabled. All members of the family dedicate time to taking care of the disabled child. Some common and every day needs a disabled child may need are, personal care, feed meals, taking them to therapy sessions and also provided them with their proper medications. And most often these responsibilities get pushed on the able sibling to do. It is not easy, having to care for the disabled child 24/7 these responsibilities may fall on any family member such as mother, father, sibling or grandparents. Both parents are busy working to care and provide for the family. In wishful thinking it would be nice to have a parents who is able to stay at home and care for the disabled child. Having that one on one parent connection is important in many aspects. Some families are fortunate to have only one parent who can work and provides for the family, but not every family is able to have that ability. It seems that families that have that one on one parent connection and caring for the child, are happier and function more smoothly. You may be thinking that both parents should care for the disabled child equally, which is true but both parents will get overworked quicker.

Another common situation is when there is a single parent caring for the family, his or her family may consist of multiple able children and one disabled child. In this situation the single parent is more likely to become overworked. Parents in this situation try to be strong for their family and try to be stress free but the parents may need to seek assistance from programs or family members to care for the disabled child. All children need attention and support from their parents but when a single family house hold it may seem that the parent it constantly showing the disable child more attention then the other children she or he might have. This can cause jealously between the siblings. Until they are able to understand that their sibling has a metal illness and needs 24/7 care. Once they understand that about their sibling they can become a big help to the single parent.

Sometimes parents make negotiations with the able child to care for their sibling and may get allowance in return. If the able child is older than the disabled child and can handle the responsibility, this is what is seen in most cases. At the same time the able sibling tries to have a personal life with friends but often it is hard and seems unfair. The able child thinks life is unfair because they have a huge obligation of providing care for their sibling. While the disable child thinks life is unfair because all they can do is receive care and can’t provide any in return, the disabled sibling child wishing they were able body like their sibling. Both siblings are in tough situations, they may feel like they are stuck for the rest of their lives. Family member may sometimes think it is not fair and the disabled child may have the same thought but coming from different point of views. Another tough situation a family may experience is when a younger sibling is too young to understand. The younger sibling will understand the conditions of their sibling but for many years they have no clue. They don’t understand that their brother or sister has autism, down syndrome or maybe a condition that causes them to be wheelchair bound. This can have a huge impact of the families stress, having to explain to the younger sibling that their older sibling has a mental illness. Eventually the younger child will learn about their siblings metal illness and love them just the same.

Having a disabled child can cause a lot of stress on the parents and the entire family. The stress can come from being overworked and constantly worrying about the disabled child when a family member is not with them. Another stress causer is keeping up with the disabled childs schedule, doctors appointment can cause parents to mess work. Some disabled family members receive therapy. Some therapy sessions the disabled child may attend are Physical therapy, speech therapy or occupation therapy. Parents and family members wishing there disabled child was normal or able body can cause a constant amount of stress.

The author has collected and analyzed the psychological literature examining the Chronic Sorrow of parents who give birth to children with disabilities. She describes the ongoing grief—similar to the grief of parents whose child dies—caused by “the loss of an idealized normal child.” One parent reports that he and others suffer “months and years of anguish, roller coaster cycles of elation and depression as the parents try to deny the evidence before their eyes that their child is less than ordinary or normal.” Their ongoing grief that there child was born with and will likely always live with a disability.

The effect on normal siblings is not described in this source, but is easy to imagine from what is described. “Parents cannot effectively mourn the loss of the idealized child because of the unrelenting daily demands of the living disabled child,” which will reasonably deprive them of the psychic strength to properly nurture their “normal” children as they deserve. And that will likely cause resentment in the siblings. Parents who feel “helpless, hopeless, and anxious” all the time, and who react with “anger, resentment, and aggression” to the frustration of their predicament will not parent as well as they should.

 I used this article to establish that parents of a handicapped child are stunted in their ability to properly nurture their other children. Then, since the parents are grieving, I sought and found articles that address how the death of a sibling affects the parent-child relationship with the survivors. Those healthy siblings suffer a loss of affection from their parents along with the burden of being the surviving child, of whom much more is expected and demanded.

My point is a child who is able or disabled has to obligation to “return the favor” to their parents unless negotiated between the child and patent. But Im rebutting that it is not fair for a disabled child to “return the favor.” It may or may not be the child or parents fault the child is disabled but it is something the family has to live with. Why should a disabled child have to “return the favor” when they wish to not be disabled and think it is unfair.

 


 

 

Work Cited

1. Copley, Margaret Freeman, and John B. Bodensteiner. “Chronic Sorrow in Families of Disabled Children.” Journal of Child Neurology, vol. 2, no. 1, 1987, pp. 67–70., doi:10.1177/088307388700200113.

2. Featherstone H: A difference in the family, in Living With a Disabled Child. New York, Penguin Books, 1980, pp 232, 233.

Reflective—pdqlover

Core Value I. My work demonstrates that I used a variety of social and interactive practices that involve recursive stages of exploration, discovery, conceptualization, and development.

During the course an assignment I did that called for recursive feedback as stated in core value I, was my rebuttal argument. In my rebuttal argument I demonstrated my point of view for my research paper. I discovered sources that helped back up my thesis and sources that had a different point of view from mine. When I received feedback it allowed me to make many corrections to my writing and the feedback will help me create a stronger rewrite that guides me into my own thoughts on the topic.  Professor Hodges, provided thorough feedback that will allow me to develop my writing in a fashion that is comprehensive and understandable.

Core Value II. My work demonstrates that I placed texts into conversation with one another to create meaning by synthesizing ideas from various discourse communities. 

During the course an assignment I did that called for synthesizing ideas from various discourse communities stated in core value II would be Safer Saw. In this assignment we had to search a variety of sources and then include summaries about the claims that were made in the article. Then understand the claims that each article was making, and put them all into categories such as factual claims, opinion, evaluation or proposals. Next we had to explain the logic behind the claim. This particular assignment is something I never had much practice with so it was very helpful and is a tool I will always know for my future. This assignment was also interesting because we had to read though each article and search though the text for the claim. An article can sometimes explain a claim in many different ways, so sometime it was difficult.

Core Value III. My work demonstrates that I rhetorically analyzed the purpose, audience, and contexts of my own writing and other texts and visual arguments.

During the course I demonstrated that I was able to rhetorically analyze the purpose, audience, and contexts of my own writing and other texts and visual arguments as stated in core value III, this was demonstrated in Visual Rhetoric/ Visual Rewrite. The visual rhetoric was an assignment that I enjoyed doing and learned a lot from. I learned to use images instead of words to create meaning, emotions, judgments in viewers. My overall explanation of the video was presented through my writing of the images that I saw. With these images I was able to analyze them and translate each image into overall  context meaning.

Core Value IV: My work demonstrates that I have met the expectations of academic writing by locating, evaluating, and incorporating illustrations and evidence to support my own ideas and interpretations.

During the course I demonstrated that I have met the expectations of academic writing by locating, evaluating, and incorporating illustrations and evidence to support my own ideas and interpretations as stated in core value IV, this was demonstrated in my proposal +5 assignment.  During this assignment I exemplified that I was able to incorporate necessary sources that would provide quality evidence that supported my thesis. I was also able to show my ability to analyze these sources and translate them into brief summaries that thoroughly explained how these sources were related to my thesis. I located these sources through Google Scholar and Rowan library. Lastly in this assignment, I was given a opportunity explain the true meaning of these articles as well as show what message the article partied.

Core Value V. My work demonstrates that I respect my ethical responsibility to represent complex ideas fairly and to the sources of my information with appropriate citation. 

During the course I demonstrated that I respect my ethical responsibility to represent complex ideas fairly and to the sources of my information with appropriate citation as stated in core value in V. This core value was demonstrated through my Annotated bibliography. In this assignment I was asked to locate scholarly sources that supported my topic, as well as incorporate these sources into my research paper. I not only demonstrated how to incorporate these sources into my essay, but I also showed that I properly cited the beginning and end of every source to assure that the authors received full credit for their work.

 

Bibliography—pdqlover

 


A Revised First Source

  1. Copley, Margaret Freeman, and John B. Bodensteiner. “Chronic Sorrow in Families of Disabled Children.” Journal of Child Neurology, vol. 2, no. 1, 1987, pp. 67–70., doi:10.1177/088307388700200113.

Background: The author has collected and analyzed the psychological literature examining the Chronic Sorrow of parents who give birth to children with disabilities. She describes the ongoing grief—similar to the grief of parents whose child dies—caused by “the loss of an idealized normal child.” One parent reports that he and others suffer “months and years of anguish, roller coaster cycles of elation and depression as the parents try to deny the evidence before their eyes that their child is less than ordinary or normal.” 

The effect on normal siblings is not described in this source, but is easy to imagine from what is described. “Parents cannot effectively mourn the loss of the idealized child because of the unrelenting daily demands of the living disabled child,” which will reasonably deprive them of the psychic strength to properly nurture their “normal” children as they deserve. And that will likely cause resentment in the siblings. Parents who feel “helpless, hopeless, and anxious” all the time, and who react with “anger, resentment, and aggression” to the frustration of their predicament will not parent as well as they should.

How I Used It: I used this article to establish that parents of a handicapped child are stunted in their ability to properly nurture their other children. Then, since the parents are grieving, I sought and found articles that address how the DEATH of a sibling affects the parent-child relationship with the survivors. Those healthy siblings suffer a loss of affection from their parents along with the burden of being the surviving child, of whom much more is expected and demanded.


 

2. Chien, Yi-Ling, et al. “School Functions in Unaffected Siblings of Youths with Autism Spectrum Disorders.” SpringerLink, Springer US, 6 July 2017, link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10803-017-3223-0.

Background: This article is about the question of whether or not the normal child and handicapped child brother and sister relationship differ in any significant way from children in any other non-handicapped brother and sister relationship.

How I used it: This article proves that growing up with a handicapped brother and sister can have some differences in the house and in school or public.

3. Hartley, S., et al. “How Do Carers of Disabled Children Cope? The Ugandan Perspective.”Child: Care, Health and Development, Blackwell Science Ltd, 16 Feb. 2005, onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2214.2004.00464.x/full.

Background: This article describes caring for a disabled family member generally falls on one person sometimes two, specifically females. Male members of the family such as father or uncles usually control the key decisions concerning the child and the associated resources.

How I used it: This article proves that most care providers are woman as nurtures.

4. Franklin, Anita, and Patricia Sloper. “Participation of Disabled Children and Young People in Decision Making Within Social Services Departments: A Survey of Current and Recent Activities in England | The British Journal of Social Work | Oxford Academic.” OUP Academic, Oxford University Press, 10 Oct. 2005, http://www.academic.oup.com/bjsw/article-abstract/36/5/723/1645153/Participation-of-Disabled-Children-and-Young.

Background: This article is an investigation concerning the participation of disabled children within decision-making regarding their own care and in service development. Such as care given to them in the home and care provided to them from a provider.

How I used it:  This article proves, if possible the disabled should be a part and current when decisions are made about their care options.

5.www.researchgate.net/publication/233648603_Depression_Symptoms_and_Emotional_States_in_Parents_of_Disabled_and_Non-Disabled_Children.

Background: This article is a survey between parents of handicapped and non handicapped children and in difference in how they develop symptoms of depression.

How I used it: This article proves that being a parent can be stressful but being a parent of a disabled child causes excessive stress.

6. Strawbridge, William J. 1940-. “The Effects of Social Factors on Adult Children Caring for Older Parents.” University of Washington Libraries ResearchWorks Service, 1 Jan. 1991, digital.lib.washington.edu/researchworks/handle/1773/8869.

Background: This article is a test to evaluate the physical and emotional state of caregivers, caring for a disabled person. The results show that they have a poor mental health themselves causes by stress and family conflict.

How I used it: This article was the extra information I needed to prove that being a caregiver is not easy. I used it to emphasize that being a sibling care giving requires time and patience.

7. Featherstone H: A difference in the family, in Living With a Disabled Child. New York, Penguin Books, 1980, pp 232, 233.

Background:  This article is about the community-based rehabilitation (CBR) in Uganda. It was created by the World Health Organization in 1989 to help families cope with taking care of a disabled family member and helps to improve the utility of life of the disabled and their family.

How I used it: This article helped me in my writing to explain various programs that help families with disabled children.

8. “Understanding emotions in others: mirror neuron dysfunction in children with autism spectrum disorders”  https://www.nature.com/articles/nn1611

Background: This article goes into great detail about the autism spectrum and what it actually is. It also discusses other mental illness children may be diagnosed with.

How I used it: I used this article to help me have better understanding of the definition  of each mental illness.

9. Reichman, Nancy E., et al. “Impact of Child Disability on the Family.” SpringerLink, Springer US, 1 Dec. 2007, link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10995-007-0307-z.

Background: This article is about the relationship between the parents and children, their living arrangements whether they need special accommodations for the disabled child and relationships with other extended family members and the children.

How I used it: I used the article to explain how taking care of the disabled and they responsibilities that come with it may fall on extended family members.

10. “Mothers Who Care.” Journal of Family Issues, journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/019251391012002005?legid=spjfi%3B12%2F2%2F211c12%2F2%2F211r12%2F2%2F211p12%2F2%2F211c12%2F2%2F211p12%2F2%2F211.

Background: This article is about mothers who care about the process of care of their children as they get older. It also explores that women are the dominant sex when it comes to being a care giver to a family member.

How I used it:  I used this article in to explain my personal experience with only women being care givers in my family.

Rebuttal—pdqlover

“Who Owes Who, Child or Adult”

My research is about family responsibilities when the family has a disabled child. To be clear it is not easy, having to care for the disabled child 24/7 these responsibilities may fall on any family member such as mother, father, sibling or grandparents. Being in that situation can cause stress and tension in the family. Family member may sometimes think it is not fair and the disabled child may have the same thought but coming from different point of views.

In a “normal” family when the parents get of age and need help caring for themselves the children step in and provide care for them or they choose other options if necessary in most situations.When a mother a father have a disabled child, and that child is the only child they have, what happens when they get old and need to be cared for? What happens to the disabled child who needs to be cared for? Yes, there are plenty of other options that can be put into place but what if that is not the families wishes. The responsibilities extend to other family members such as aunt’s, uncles and cousins.

My point is a child who is able or disabled has to obligation to “return the favor” to their parents unless negotiated between the child and patent. But Im rebutting that it is not fair for a disabled child to “return the favor.” It may or may not be the child or parents fault the child is disabled but it is something the family has to live with. Why should a disabled child have to “return the favor” when they wish to not be disabled and think it is unfair.

Works Cited

https://digital.lib.washington.edu/researchworks/handle/1773/8869

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2214.2004.00464.x/full

“Robust Verbs-pdqlover”

In Vancouver there is a huge problem with heroin addicts committing crimes to support their habits. The “free heroin for addicts” program is doing everything they can to stop the addicts. The problem is a large crime rate due to the addicts. Obviously that addicts have a hard time getting through their day to day lives. Daily activities such as jobs, interactions, and relationships are hard to maintain because they are using. Heroin users being addicted, they will do whatever they have to do to get their hands on the drug. Types of crimes committed are those of breaking and entering as well as stealing. No limits to where they will go to retrieve this drug so that they can feed their addiction. The problem with this program is that it won’t help to ween these addicts off using heroin. Only trying to save the city from rising crime rates that they’re up to. By providing the drug, these addicts will be off the streets, which in turn will prevent them from committing minor street crimes. This will also keep the heroin users out of the hospital. It’s pointless that the hospitals have to deal with people who want to use bad drugs or unsanitary needles and find themselves being unable to afford hospital bills and hard to cope without the drug. Programs give people free heroin in the cleanest way possible. In return this will fix the city  but not the addiction that these people face.

“Enough About You—pdqlover”

Money seems to have a big role in our society; we can’t do much or get far if we don’t have any. Money is valuable in different ways, even when we don’t see it physically. In today’s society we must have faith in the government and in the banking system that our money is being handled in the proper manner; if not, then we would have to hide all of our money under our mattress or around our house. I have no clue what happens in the banks, or how they take care of our money. I always thought money was simple; we either have some or we don’t—that’s it. However, being introduced to this assignment, the Yap Fei, US gold, French francs, Brazilian cruzeros, and debit accounts now seem similar. We don’t actually see our money being transferred. When we get paid, we aren’t handed cash, we don’t receive a physical check, the money’s all directly transferred to our bank account, and we just have to trust that we have more money.

White Paper– pdqlover

Organized Content descriptions

Parent and child obligation negotiation

Able sibling and disabled sibling relationship

Family stress when taking care of a disabled family member

Working Hypotheses

  1. Every parent at sometime in their life feels the need of “payback” from their child.
  2. An able child may think life is not far and he disable child thinks life is not fair also but they have different reasons.

Topics for Smaller Papers

Definition/Classification Argument
Parents have total obligations to give to their child, a child has no obligations to their parents unless negotiated between the two. When raising a child with disabilities it can be different the parents still have all obligations of caring for the child but will the disabled child ever have a negotiation with their parents to have obligations of their own?

Cause / Effect Argument

Taking care of a child with disabilities can cause major stress on the entire family.

Rebuttal Argument

When a child is born with a disability the parent did not choose to live that lifestyle of taking care of a disabled child so they may choose not to do so.

Current state of the research –

The current status of my research is well. The topic I choose can go in many different directions. I have to be specific when looking for research but overall I have been successful finding source material.

Proposal +5

For my research essay I will be examining the unfairness of life. A child with disabilities  who requires so much care in he or she’s youth can’t pay back the debt to their parents when they get old and infirm and could really use her help. My argument will go into detail about how I can relate to this very situation of being a sibling of a disablied child and wondering what the future holds.

  1. Journal of Child Neurology http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/088307388700200113

The Essential Content of the Article:  This article is about two common words chronic and sorrow. Chronic sorrow describe the process of parent bereavement in response to life with a disabled child. It also discusses how parents and siblings have to put many hours into caring for the disabled child.

What it Proves: This article proves that taking care of a child with disabilities is a hard job and takes toll on the family.

2. Siblings of handicapped children https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF01531585?LI=true

The Essential Content of the Article: This article is about the question of whether or not the normal child and handicapped child brother and sister relationship differ in any significant way from children in any other non-handicapped brother and sister relationship.

What it Proves: This article proves that growing up with a handicapped brother and sister can have some differences in the house and in school or public.

3. How do cares of disabled children cope? http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2214.2004.00464.x/full

The Essential Content of the Article: This article describes caring for a disabled family member generally falls on one person sometimes two, specifically females. Male members of the family such as father or uncles usually control the key decisions concerning the child and the associated resources.

What it Proves: This article proves that most care providers are woman as nurtures.

4. Participation of Disabled Children and Young People in Decision Making Within Social Services Departments https://academic.oup.com/bjsw/article/36/5/723/1645153/Participation-of-Disabled-Children-and-Young

The Essential Content of the Article: This article is a investigation concerning the participation of disabled children within decision-making regarding their own care and in service development. Such as care given to them in the home and care provided to them from a provider.

What it Proves: This article proves, if possible the disabled should be a part and current when decisions are made about their care options.

5. DEPRESSION SYMPTOMS AND EMOTIONAL STATES IN PARENTS OF DISABLED AND NON-DISABLED CHILDREN http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/sbp/sbp/1999/00000027/00000001/art00007

The Essential Content of the Article: This article is a survey between parents of handicapped and non handicapped children and in difference in how they develop symptoms of depression.

What it Proves: This article proves that being a parent can be stressful but being a parent of a disabled child causes excessive stress.