Bibliography-Jsoccer5

Annotated Bibliography

1.Boles, Myde, et al. “Ability of a mass media campaign to influence knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors about sugary drinks and obesity.” Preventive medicine 67 (2014): S40-S45.

Background: This article discusses the relationship media has with the way people act. The article shows that when the media shows a group of people how bad sugary drinks are they become more informed and then change behaviors. In this specific study they talk about a study done in Oregon where they informed people about how bad sugary drinks are for you and how this campaign helped the people in the area become more knowledgeable and how a large portion of these people stated they would change their ways.

How I used It: I used this source in my research paper to help show how mass media campaigns like the one in this article can be used to educate Americans on the affects sugary drinks have on their health.

2.Cespedes, Andrea. “Benefits of Sports Drinks Like Gatorade and Powerade.” Leaf Group, 09 June 2015. Web. 04 Dec. 2016

Background: This article talks about the positive benefits of sports drinks. The author discusses the benefits of electrolytes, carbohydrates and when is a good time to drink these beverages. The article offers vague information and leaves the reader to interpret alot.

How I used It: I used this article in my rebuttal argument as well as my research paper to help prove the point that Americans are lead to believe certain things because of the vagueness associated with different health claims.

3.Childhood Obesity Causes & Consequences.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 19 June 2015. Web. 30 Nov. 2016.

Background: This article talks about the influence community involvement has on societies behaviors and how that impacts childhood obesity. When it comes to the community’s involvement a lot of causes are based around food. At the end of the article it discusses health risks of childhood obesity.

How I used it: I used this article to show a fact about how many children consume sugary drinks in my definitional argument. I used one of the overwhelming statistics on sugary drinks to help show that sugary drinks are a problem but lacks the complete definition of a sugary drink.

4.Childhood Obesity Facts.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 17 Nov. 2016. Web. 30 Nov. 2016

Background: The Center for Disease Control released statistics based on Childhood Obesity in 2011-2014.

Facts from the CDC

  • The prevalence of obesity has remained fairly stable at about 17% and affects about 12.7 million children and adolescents.
  • Overall obesity prevalence among children whose adult head of household completed college was approximately half that of those whose adult head of household did not complete high school (9% vs 19% among girls; 11% vs 21% among boys) in 1999–2010.
  • Obesity prevalence was the highest among children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 100% or less (household income that is at or below the poverty threshold), followed by those in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 101%–130%, and then found to be lower in children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 131% or larger (greater household income).

How I used it: I used this article in my causal argument and research paper to help readers see how many people are affected by childhood obesity.

5.Gillis, Linda J., and Oded Bar-Or. “Food away from home, sugar-sweetened drink consumption and juvenile obesity.” Journal of the American College of Nutrition22.6 (2003): 539-545.

Background: This article discusses the relationship between people’s diets and their weight. They complete a study in which they found that obese children consume more meat, grains, sugary drinks, and processed food, while also lacking fruits and vegetables in everyday diets. It also talks about the effects that eating out has on the food consumption of children.

How I used it: I used this article to help support the direct correlation between obesity and sugary drink intake based on their study.

6.Go, A. S., D. Mozaffarian, and V. L. Roger. “Sugar-sweetened beverages initiatives can help fight childhood obesity.” circulation 127 (2013): e6-e245.

Background: This article discusses an option for lowering sugary drink consumption by taxing it and shows how it will also help the economy. They also define sugary drinks into types of beverages and talk a little bit about why it is so bad for you.

How I Used it: I used this cite to add onto my definition for my definitional argument and research paper.

7.Harris, Jennifer L., et al. “Evaluating Sugary Drink Nutrition and Marketing to Youth.” New Haven, CT: Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity (2011).

Background: This article discusses childhood obesities direct link to sugary drinks and how many of these companies promote this unhealthy life style. While providing general accurate statements it also provides a great deal of statistics to support the fact that sugary drinks are bad for children and yet market directly to them.

How I Used it: I used this article in my Definitional argument to help my argument that it’s hard to determine what is considered good for you and bad for you due to the positive health claims. Unfortunately the claims aren’t always what they seem. I also used it in my definitional argument to help my reader understand why sugary drinks are so bad for people but especially children.

8.Johnson. “How much is too much?” Research. SugarScience.org, 30 Mar. 2014. Web. 5 Dec. 2016.

Background:  In this article they discuss the concern for how much sugar Americans intake against what Americans are actually consuming using lots of facts and statistics.

How I used it: I used this article in my causal argument to help readers see how much sugar should be consumed against how much is actually being consumed.

9. Lynch, Barbara S., and Richard J. Bonnie. “Youth access to tobacco products.” (1994).

Background: This article discusses the usage of tobacco products, especially after the nationwide age restriction.

How I used it: I used this paper to help support my thesis and to prove that by adding an age limitation on the purchase of tobacco the amount of underage smokers went down, therefore the same would happen if America put an age restriction on sugar beverages.

10.Malik, Vasanti S., Matthias B. Schulze, and Frank B. Hu. “Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain: a systematic review.” The American journal of clinical nutrition84.2 (2006): 274-288.

Background: This article takes an in depth look at the correlation of sugary drinks and weight gain. The review uses different investigations and studies to come to the conclusion that the intake of sugary beverages are in conjunction with weight gain and obesity in children and adults. It explains that theses beverages also provide little nutritional value and result in incomplete compensation of energy at subsequent meals. Ultimately the conclusion of the article is that these drinks should be discouraged and there needs to be more efforts to promote consumption of healthier beverages.

How I Used it: I used this article in my Causal argument to explain the different factors that play a role in obesity as well as sugary drink consumption.

11.McKinlay, Rodrick D. “Obesity Action Coalition » Childhood Obesity: The Link to Drinks.” Childhood Obesity: The Link to Drinks Comments. Obesity Action Coalition, n.d. Web. 04 Dec. 2016.

Background: This article talks about the effect sugary drinks have on childhood obesity. It discusses how much is consumed and the effect caffeine has as well. It ends by talking about parents roles on changing this problem by adapting a healthier lifestyle as well to role model how to be healthier for the children.

How I used It: I used this article in my causal argument when explaining how much soda is consumed by Americans and how American can start to slowly change this worldwide problem.

12.Ogden, Cynthia . Consumption of Sugar Drinks in the US (2005-2008), et al. . US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 2011.

Background: This article discusses the consumption in kilocalories and the differences of consumption based on age, race, ethnicity, income and location. It also explains how much is consumed and gives a definition for sugary drinks.

How I Used it: I used this article in my definitional argument as it had a very accurate and comprehensible definition to help guide my explanation of what a sugary drink is.

13.”Reducing Consumption of Sugar-sweetened Beverages to Reduce the Risk of Childhood Overweight and Obesity.” Reducing Consumption of Sugar-sweetened Beverages to Reduce the Risk of Childhood Overweight and Obesity. World Health Organization, 24 Aug. 2016. Web. 04 Dec. 2016.

Background: The World Health Organization talks about how sugary drinks are directly linked to obesity. Consumption of these beverages is incredibly high and suggest poor diets. They offer suggestions on how much sugar should be consumed to be considered healthy.

How I used It: I used this article in my causal argument to show proof that sugary drinks are not nutritional and do not help one feel full.

14.Sugary Drinks and Childhood Obesity. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009;163(4):400. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.16

Background: This article discusses how sugary drinks can lead to childhood obesity as well as other diseases. It gives examples of what sugary drinks are and breaks it down into four categories. The article goes over the factors that contribute to this and how they contribute to the cause of other diseases.

How I Used it: I used this article in my definitional argument to provide proof of types and examples of sugary drinks. I also used this article in my causal argument to explain how the body reacts when it has taken in too much sugar at one time.

 

 

 

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