Research Paper- jsoccer5

America Needs to Cut Out the Sugar

Americans in today’s society are living their lives like they never have before. With the advancement of technology and constant access to processed foods and artificially sweetened beverages, the national percentage of overweight people has gone up immensely. This has had a horrible effect on children. Statistics released by the Center for Disease Control state that about 12.7 million children are affected by obesityAs these changes become more and more normal, such as letting children drinking soda, this percentage has grown and childhood obesity has become a nationwide epidemic.  In an article published by the American Society for Nutrition, they discuss how obesity comes from a reflection of intense interactions of genetic, metabolic, cultural, environmental, socioeconomic and behavioral factors. All of these factors play a role into the overconsumption of sugary beverages and how it affects weight gain. For years Americans have been unsure how to stop this nationwide problem as there is no one stop cure for all of these problems. Many efforts have been made to educate more people on this matter, unfortunately nothing has worked. The saying “History repeats itself” is nothing but true in this situation. The last time Americans were consuming something bad for them without knowing it was the consumption of tobacco, and now unfortunately it is the consumption of sugary drinks. The consumption of Tobacco and sugary drinks is very similar, therefor the country should put an age restriction on the purchase of these beverages the same way they did for tobacco as it has made a drastic positive impact on society.

The first step in the process of doing this is going to be to inform more Americans, being sure to include all demographics, of what sugary drinks constitute of. Many people really do not know what a sugary drink is. The ones that come to mind are drinks like Coke and Kool-Aid but sugary drinks include more than you would think. According to the National Cancer Center, “sugary drinks consist of fruit drinks, soda, energy drinks, sport drinks, and sweetened waters.”  The American Heart Association also gives a list of what is included in a sugary drink, including sweetened teas to the list as well. Some form of sugar is added to almost all drinks making it taste delicious and making the consumer want more. In the Advice for Patients section of the Arch Pediatric Medical Journal they give explicit examples of sugar drinks, including Coke, 7up, Gatorade, Hi-C, Monster, and cranberry juice cocktail. For many Americans they do not know how much sugar is in these drinks and in fact consider some of these drinks listed as healthy.

In an article written by Roderick McKinley he states that the average American consumes 1.6 cans of soda a day, resulting in them consuming more than 500 cans of soda in one year. Think about a one 12 ounce can of Coca-Cola, that can of soda contains 39 grams of sugar. According to an article published by Sugar Science “the average amount of added sugar a child should consume in one day is 18.5 grams, however this may vary based on age, but will should never be more than 25 grams.” If a child consumes just one can of Coca-Cola a day they have already doubled their sugar intake for the day. Sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in a youth’s diet and also the main source of calorie intake. The U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend “the total intake of discretional calories, including sugars and fats, should range between 5-15% per day. Yet most American children consume about 16% of their intake from added sugars alone, not including fats or any other foods.” While many Americans are shocked to find out these statistics they also don’t always understand where these added sugars are coming from, and do not seem to realize that they come from the drinks they are consuming.

These sugary drinks are often consumed without much thought. The fact that the person is consuming the drink and is drinking large amounts of sugar as well as drinking a large percentage of calories, not to mention doing so very quickly is something that most Americans don’t thing about or really care. What becomes the problem is that many people consume more of this than their body needs. In an advice column published by the Arch Pediatric Medical Journal they state that these drinks are all consumed before a person’s body can realize they have consumed it which in turn is before the body has time to realize it is full in the same way a body would when eating solid food.   The World Health Organization also adds to this by stating “these drinks have little nutritional value and do not provide the same feeling of fullness as solid food does,” making it so they continue to consume more even though their body has had enough.  The more people consume sugary drinks, the more sugar they have in their system, which exceeds the amount they need to be able to produce energy.  Because of the over consumption, the body breaks down only what it needs for energy and the rest is stored as fat. Over many years of consuming too much sugar and the body gets used to storing the excess as fat, especially after starting at a young age, the fat continues to add up ultimately resulting in the person becoming obese. In a study conducted by the American College of Nutrition they found that “Obese children consume significantly more servings of fats and sugary beverages than non-obese children in a study done between the two groups.” Many other studies have found similar results, assuring the connection between obesity and childhood obesity.

One of the leading reasons why American children are so directly affected by the consumption of sugar drinks is because of the heavy marketing toward children. According to an article published by the Rudd Foundation written by Jennifer Harris states that “In the 2 years between 2008 and 2010 children’s exposure to soda ads on TV alone doubled.” This does not include the advertisements on the internet, on the radio and in stores all around them. Sugary drinks are available everywhere from stores to schools to vending machines, which children have access to at all times. These companies have done a lot of research on what is appealing to children, and find that the best way to sell these products is through product placements and sponsorships. Harris discusses the advertisement through sponsorship by explaining that “63% of soda and energy drink ads on national TV include the sponsorship of an athlete, sports league or team, and in even some cases a sponsorship for an event or cause.” Coca-Cola’s partnership with the Olympic Games is one of the most known partnerships in the world. By this company partnering with the Olympics, a set of games that promotes healthy life styles and is composed of the best athletes in the world, they can hide the fact that their products are packed with added sugars and have no health benefits at all. Other Companies such as Red Bull have endorsed professional athletes, such a Neymar, the professional soccer play from FC Barcelona, to say that they use and love the products. When children see their favorite athletes using, wearing or talking about a product, they want to do the same, so they begin to consume products like Red Bull, having no clue how bad it is for them.

These companies are not just targeting children but they have targeted adults too. Harris also discusses how parents are lead to believe drinks like Capri Sun, Gatorade and Vitamin Water are healthy drinks to serve your children. Harris states “Parents think that nutrient claims about Vitamin C or “real” and “natural” ingredients mean that these are healthy options for children,” however these claims are not always true, and often times are focused on by the company to hid the unhealthy aspects to the beverage.

The company Gatorade is a company that markets to both kids and adults. Their promotions through endorsers, draws in children as those endorsers are athletes that all children idol, such as Serena William. The company also makes health claims, such as “thirst quencher that hydrates better than water.” In an article published by the Livestrong Foundation on the benefits of Sports Drinks, the author Amanda Cespedes says “Americans certainly seem convinced these hydrating drinks offer plenty of benefits.” Cespedes is not wrong Americans are convinced and in fact there are some benefits to drinks like Gatorade. Cespedes then continues to talk about some of the reasons why Gatorade is good for athletes by saying that “drinks like these are great for people who work out in excessive heat, for long periods of time and find themselves becoming dehydrated, as it can replace lost nutrients and energy.” The reason that products like this are great for consumption after these factors is because they are high in sugar and they have burned so many calories their body needs more calories, such as the sugar, to use as energy. Most Americans are lead to believe that articles like this one, that do not provide explicit examples of what a long period of time, ends up leaving the reader to decide how long is a long time, and coming to the conclusion that they need it too. Companies like Gatorade use their marketing to draw in customers and convince them they need their products.

While there is lots of promotions and marketing done by companies about how great their products are, there is also lots of campaigns going on all around the country to educate people on the problems with these sugar drinks. In one study done by the Preventive Medicine Journal, they look in depth at a campaign done in Oregon that focused on educating families on the amount of added sugars they are consuming in sugary drinks and how the extra calories consumed by these drinks are helping the increase of childhood obesity nationwide. The method used in the campaign was to first create awareness of the problem, eventually influencing people’s perception while motivating change, ultimately resulting in behavior changes when it comes to deciding what drinks to choose. In the overall evaluation of this specific campaign it was found that almost 80% of people that were made aware of the campaign said they were going to reduce the amount of sugary drinks they offered to their children. This is just one example of a campaigns positive effects on educating people more on the problem of sugary drinks, however these campaigns are not enough.

This nationwide epidemic cannot be ultimately solved by simply educating people through campaigns about the bad choices they are making when they drink a soda, especially with social media and large companies, like Coca-Cola, who are constantly promoting their products in a positive light to kids. While there have been many campaigns to help spread the word, there has only been one initiate attempted to help with obesity prevention efforts. This initiative included the idea to tax these beverages, in hopes that the rising price will stop people from buying the products however it did not go through. Something more needs to be done to prevent this epidemic from getting worse.

The issue of childhood obesity in American is not the first time people have been consuming something that was not good, with no knowledge of this and doing more harm to their bodies than intended. Tobacco products use to be a large part of the everyday society, similar to the way sugary drinks are today. In an article published by the National Academy of Sciences back in 1994 they discuss the changes that occurred when the Congress passed the Synar Amendment, that focusing on the control of youth access to tobacco. In the Article the author reports that in a survey taken in Illinois, 2 years after the passing of the law the number of seventh and eighth grade students that have experimented with cigarettes went from 46% to 23%. They also found that the number of kids this age who considered themselves as smokers went from 16% to 5%. While there was still a nationwide issue of enforcing these laws perfectly at this time the percentages still went down, as Americans knew if they were to get caught selling tobacco to minors they would get in trouble.

The government should put an age restriction on sugary drinks, similar to the way they added an age restriction to the purchase of cigarettes. With a new age restriction in place on the purchase of sugary drinks and stronger efforts to inform and teach Americans about healthy living and what they are putting in their bodies, the percentage of obese people would go down and hopefully stay down for many years to come, making American healthy again.

Work Cited

Boles, Myde, et al. “Ability of a mass media campaign to influence knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors about sugary drinks and obesity.” Preventive medicine 67 (2014): S40-S45.

Cespedes, Andrea. “Benefits of Sports Drinks Like Gatorade and Powerade.” Leaf Group, 09 June 2015. Web. 04 Dec. 2016

Childhood Obesity Causes & Consequences.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 19 June 2015. Web. 30 Nov. 2016.

Childhood Obesity Facts.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 17 Nov. 2016. Web. 30 Nov. 2016

Gillis, Linda J., and Oded Bar-Or. “Food away from home, sugar-sweetened drink consumption and juvenile obesity.” Journal of the American College of Nutrition 22.6 (2003): 539-545.

Go, A. S., D. Mozaffarian, and V. L. Roger. “Sugar-sweetened beverages initiatives can help fight childhood obesity.” circulation 127 (2013): e6-e245.

Harris, Jennifer L., et al. “Evaluating Sugary Drink Nutrition and Marketing to Youth.” New Haven, CT: Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity (2011).

Johnson. “How much is too much?” Research. SugarScience.org, 30 Mar. 2014. Web. 5 Dec. 2016.

Lynch, Barbara S., and Richard J. Bonnie. “Youth access to tobacco products.” (1994).

Malik, Vasanti S., Matthias B. Schulze, and Frank B. Hu. “Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain: a systematic review.” The American journal of clinical nutrition 84.2 (2006): 274-288.

McKinlay, Rodrick D. “Obesity Action Coalition » Childhood Obesity: The Link to Drinks.” Childhood Obesity: The Link to Drinks Comments. Obesity Action Coalition, n.d. Web. 04 Dec. 2016.

Ogden, Cynthia . Consumption of Sugar Drinks in the US (2005-2008), et al. . US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 2011.

Reducing Consumption of Sugar-sweetened Beverages to Reduce the Risk of Childhood Overweight and Obesity.” Reducing Consumption of Sugar-sweetened Beverages to Reduce the Risk of Childhood Overweight and Obesity. World Health Organization, 24 Aug. 2016. Web. 04 Dec. 2016.

Sugary Drinks and Childhood Obesity. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009;163(4):400. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.16

 

 

 

 

 

Reflection- jsoccer5

Core Value I. My work demonstrates that I used a variety of social and interactive practices that involve recursive stages of exploration, discovery, conceptualization, and development.

Throughout this semester I did not always utilize the complete process that is involved in this core value. I found myself often times falling behind in getting course work done on time leaving the professor not much time to give me feedback which is only my fault. However, I was able to apply this core value through the help of others around me as well as constantly building on my research to develop my research position piece. When writing my visual argument for the first time I did the assignment all wrong. After receiving feedback from Professor Hodges about not doing this assignment correctly I found time to meet with him to go over how I could improve my paper. After making proper revisions based on the feedback provided and revisiting the assignment page, I produced a very good visual analysis. I also found that because of the assignment of White Pages, I was able to fulfill this value by using my white pages as a place I constantly used to jot down ideas and sources and never stopped adding to and editing. By doing this I was able to compile my thoughts to create my research paper for the end of the semester. The format you designed for this class was confusing to me in the beginning but now makes sense as you needed to go through a process to produce your best work.

Core Value II. My work demonstrates that I placed texts into conversation with one another to create meaning by synthesizing ideas from various discourse communities. 

The design of this class was helpful in implementing conversation and ideas into my writing. My thesis for my research paper began being too broad and unclear. Through conversations we had in class as well as conversations with the Professor, I was able to narrow my thesis a bit. After the lecture we had on research tips, I began to think more about my topic and after discussing my ideas with classmates I decided to want to relate my topic to another topic. I did this by relating the age limit on tobacco and the positive affects it had on society to how we could prevent childhood obesity from getting worse. Throughout the entire semester the conversations and lectures that happened in class were extremely helpful. Also I found that the bouncing ideas off other students and classmates help to improve our ideas and writing. I feel I was able to fulfill this core value.

Core Value III. My work demonstrates that I rhetorically analyzed the purpose, audience, and contexts of my own writing and other texts and visual arguments.

In my writing throughout the semester I always considered the purpose, audience and context of my writing whenever I began to write. I found myself being more cautious of this due to our writing being on a blog website that anyone can view. While writing many of my papers, I often would view other works to see how they fulfilled the requirements and to help me make sure I did the same. I also always remembered that other students may possibly be doing the same and with that I found myself constantly analyzing the purpose and context of my papers. I feel when writing my rebuttal argument I did this as I wanted to make sure I was following the proper instructions. I was careful to analyze the text I used in the paper and build the strongest argument possible. When writing this piece, I was very cautious to remember who my audience could be and the purpose of the assignment at hand. Once I completed that assignment, I felt myself analyzing the rest of my work more intensely to make sure I was making the argument I want to make and that it is being portrayed properly.

Core Value IV: My work demonstrates that I have met the expectations of academic writing by locating, evaluating, and incorporating illustrations and evidence to support my own ideas and interpretations.

My research paper is a direct outcome of this value. I was able to use different sources to help support my own ideas through the paper. When reading and evaluating different sources, I was able to identify what pieces from these sources would benefit my arguments and I was able to incorporate them in my writing. I also found that when creating my white pages, that when I listed a summary of what was in each source, I was able to locate what was in each article and how to use the evidence most effectively in my writing. After writing my different papers and beginning to work on my annotated bibliography I found that writing how I used each source in my papers helped me better understand, if the evidence supported my own ideas properly.

Core Value V. My work demonstrates that I respect my ethical responsibility to represent complex ideas fairly and to the sources of my information with appropriate citation. 

At the beginning of the writing process I was very unsure that I was using proper citation and fulfilling my ethical responsibility as a writer. When taking this class previously, as well as another class in the writing department, I was accused of plagiarism by my professor due to not putting an in text citation and instead using a format like “in this article published/written by this person”. Professor Hodges told the class that is not how we should be citing which was confusing for me in the begging as I was afraid to do anything close to what I completed before. After Professor Hodges explained to me how to cite the way he liked I became more confident with how to use appropriate citation. In all three of my argument papers, rebuttal, definition, and causal, as well as my research paper I used proper citation with fulfilling my ethical responsibilities and giving credit to authors when using their ideas.

 

Rebuttal Rewrite- jsoccer5

Media’s role in a National Epidemic

The American love for sports is a love like no other. Children idolize athletes and aim to become a professional someday. Many children become completely absorbed into the world of professional sports, wearing the same clothing as professionals, acting like these professionals not only on the field but also off the field, and consuming the same foods and beverages that these athletes are thought to consume. What many children and families do not realize is that athletes are paid large amounts of money to be a spokesperson for big companies such as Gatorade and Nike, even if they don’t particularly like the brand. One industry that thrives from this idolization is the industry of sports drinks, like Gatorade and PowerAde, which was projected to reach 2 billion dollars in 2016. Americans cannot get enough of these products and are led to believe they are good for them because these athletes use them. In an article written by Andrea Cespedes that was published on the Livestrong Foundation website she states “Americans certainly seem convinced these hydration drinks offer plenty of benefits.” While Americans are not wrong, these drinks do have some beneficial factors. Unfortunately they are full of negative factors and the positive factors are only beneficial to a small percentage of people.

Cespedes defines sports drinks to be “artificially flavored water containing added electrolytes.” Americans are aware that electrolytes are essential when it comes to working out. Electrolytes are minerals that you lose when sweating and help with proper muscle function and they need to be replaced after exercise, which is why it is essential to consume when working out and exercising. When Americans found out what electrolytes were and why they are needed, they then assumed that the only answer on how to recover from sweeting and working out is the consumption of sports drinks. By this definition, sports drinks are ultimately considered mineral enhanced and flavored water not posing any health threats. Cespedes also talks about how sports drinks are a great source of carbohydrates that can be quickly absorbed and turned into fuel, ready immediately after exercise lasting around 90 minutes. She also states in her piece that the Journal of International Society of Sports Nutrition showed “in 2014 that these drinks enhanced the body’s ability to break down carbs during exercise and can enhance exercise.” Cespedes also discusses how these drinks can work as pre-workout energy boost if you haven’t eaten prior to a workout and how they are essential after a workout to prepare for the next workout scheduled. All of these statements lead Americans to think that anyone that exercises should consume these beverages as they are good for them, however this is untrue as most Americans do not exercise to the extent and intensity needed to consume these drinks. In result of Americans reading an article like this, the assumption that as long as you exercise for an hour to an hour and a half consuming sports drinks are good for you. What comes as a result of that thought process is children constantly consuming sports drinks as most of their sports last at least an hour and these children push to consume these beverages as their favorite athletes do as well. What Americans are not made aware of is the amount of negative impacts these drinks can have if consumption is made by people who are not exercising to the extremes needed to lose all those electrolytes and carbs.

The biggest problem of these ‘oh so famous’ sports drinks is that they fall in the same category as sugary drinks, such as fruit punch and red bull, and the consumption of sugar drinks is a key factor in the nationwide epidemic of childhood obesity.  For many the idea that these sports drinks that are supposed to be good for you, are actually full of sugar and are bad for you seems to be confusing and conflicting. The way media and companies such as Gatorade use celebrities to promote the product and talk positively sells Americans on the decision to purchase and consume sports drinks. Unfortunately Americans forgot that these drinks are actually packed with sugar. When looking at the back of a 20 ounce bottle of Gatorade, it contains 35 grams of sugar, and 150 calories. According to the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans “the suggested amount of discretional calorie intake for children, which includes sugars and fats, should be about 5-15% and the consumption of sugar should be between 12 and 25 grams per day and based on their age. ” While these are the ideal suggestions for ultimate health, Americans actually consume about 82 grams of sugar a day as well as 16% of their caloric intake which comes strictly from sugar. That bottle of Gatorade is almost double what the amount of sugar intake should include and while these drinks are recommended to be consumed during exercise, a child who plays soccer for an hour twice a week is not working hard enough to lose all those electrolytes and carbs making that excess sugar from the sports drinks turn into fat.

While these sports drinks are promoted in a way that makes them seems healthy and good for you especially after exercise that is not actually the case. These large companies use professional athletes to promote these products, as they actually are exercising to the extent that is needed to have to replenish the missing electrolytes, when in reality most everyday Americans do not exercise to that extend especially children. Big corporations like Gatorade use media to its advantage to promote these products to make money, even though the information given is often only for a particular person. For parents who get their information about these drinks from other sources such as the article on the Livestrong site, the authors use vague terms and phrases, such as Cespedes did, when talking about electrolyte replacement stating “They must be replaced if you sweat a lot or are exercising at a relatively intense level for more than an hour.” The lack of clarity on what a lot is or what a relatively intense exercise is leaves rooms for Americans to determine that they are fulfilling those requirements so they must consume these products. Throughout many campaigns and initiatives more people are becoming properly informed about the overall health benefits of drinks like this. Americans are slowly becoming more and more health conscious, resulting in less consumption of these drinks and more consumption of water and other beneficial beverages.

Work Cited

Cespedes, Andrea. “Benefits of Sports Drinks Like Gatorade and Powerade.” Leaf Group, 09 June 2015. Web. 04 Dec. 2016

 Johnson. “How much is too much?” Research. SugarScience.org, 30 Mar. 2014. Web. 5 Dec. 2016.

 

Rebuttal Argument- Jsoccer5

Americans love for sports is a love like no other, children idolize athletes and aim to become a professional someday. For many children they become completely absorbed into the world of professional sports, wearing the same clothing as professionals, acting like these professionals not only on the field but also off the field, and consuming the same foods and beverages that these athletes are thought to consume. What many children, and families do not realize is that many of times athletes are paid large amounts of money to be a spokes person for big companies such as Gatorade and Nike even if they don’t particularly like the brand. One industry that thrives from this idolization is the industry of sports drinks, such as Gatorade and Powerade, which was projected to reach 2 billion dollars in 2016. American’s cannot get enough of these products and are lead to believe they are good for them because these athletes use them. In an article written by Andrea Cespedes that was published on the livestrong foundation website she states “Americans certainly seem convinced these hydration drinks offer plenty of benefits.” While Americans are not wrong, these drinks do have some beneficial factors, they also are full of negative factors and the positive factors are only beneficial to a small percentage of people.

Cespedes considers sports drinks to be “artificially flavored water containing added electrolytes.” Americans are aware that electrolytes are essential in recovering and preparing to do any type of exercise lasting about an hour. Electrolytes are minerals that you lose when sweating and help with proper muscle function and need to be replaced after exercise. When American find out what electrolytes are and why they are needed the only answer on how to recover from sweeting and working out is the consumption of sports drinks. By this definition, sports drinks are ultimately considered mineral enhanced and flavored water not posing any health threats. Cespedes also talks about how sports drinks are a great source of carbohydrates that can be quickly absorbed and turned into fuel ready immediately after exercise lasting around 90 minutes. She also states in her piece that the Journal of International Society of Sports Nutrition showed “in 2014 that these drinks enhance the body ability to break down carbs during exercise and can enhance exercise.” Cespedes also discusses how these drinks can work as pre-workout energy boost if you haven’t eaten prior to a workout, and how they are essential after a workout to prepare for the next workout scheduled. All of these statements lead Americans to think that anyone that exercises should consume these beverages as they are good for them, however this is untrue as most Americans do not exercise to the extent and intensity needed to consume these drinks. In result of Americans reading an article like this the assumption that as long as you exercise for an hour to an hour and a half consuming sports drinks are good for you. What comes as a result of that thought process is children constantly consuming sports drinks as most of their sports last at least an hour, and these children push to consume these beverages as their favorite athletes do as well. What Americans are not made aware of is the amount of negative impacts these drinks can have if consumption is made by people who are not exercising to the extremes needed to lose all those electrolytes and carbs.

The biggest problem of these oh so famous sports drinks is that they fall in the same category as sugary drinks, such as fruit punch and red bull, and the consumption of sugar drinks is a key factor in the nationwide epidemic of childhood obesity. For many the idea that these sports drinks that are suppose to be good for you are actually full of sugar and are bad for you seems to be confusing and conflicting. The way media and companies such as Gatorade use celebrities to promote the product and talk positively sells Americans on the decision to purchase and consume sports drinks, and Americans forgot that these drinks are actually packed with sugar. When looking at the back of a 20 ounce bottle of Gatorade, it contains 35 grams of sugar, and 150 calories. According to the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans “the suggested amount of discretional calorie intake for children, which includes sugars and fats, should be about 5-15% and the consumption of sugar should be between 12 and 25 grams per day and based on their age. ” While these are the ideal suggestions for ultimate health Americans actually consume about 82 grams of sugar a day as well as 16% of their caloric intake comes strictly from sugar. That bottle of Gatorade is almost double what the amount of sugar intake should include, and while these drinks are recommended to be consumed during exercise, a child who plays soccer for an hour twice a week is not working hard enough to lose all those electrolytes and carbs, making that excess sugar from the sports drinks turn into fat.

While these sports drinks are promoted in a way that makes them seem healthy and good for you especially after exercise, that is not actually the case. These large companies use professional athletes to promote these products, as they actually are exercising to the extent that is needed to have to replenish the missing electrolytes, when in reality most everyday Americans do not exercise to that extend especially children. Big corporations like Gatorade use media to its advantage to promote these products to make money, even though the information given is often only for a particular person. For parents who get their information about these drinks from other sources such as the article on the livestrong cite, the authors use vague terms and phrases, such as Cespedes did when talking about electrolyte replacement stating “They must be replaced if you sweat a lot or are exercising at a relatively intense level for more than an hour.” The lack of clarity on what a lot is or what a relatively intense exercise is leaves rooms for Americans to determine that they are fulfilling those requirements so they must consume these products. Throughout many campaigns and initiatives more people are becoming properly informed about the overall health benefits of drinks like this and American is slowly becoming more and more health conscious, resulting in less consumption of these drinks and more consumption of water and other beneficial beverages.

Work Cited

Cespedes, Andrea. “Benefits of Sports Drinks Like Gatorade and Powerade.” Leaf Group, 09 June 2015. Web. 04 Dec.

Johnson. “How much is too much?” Research. SugarScience.org, 30 Mar. 2014. Web. 5 Dec. 2016.

 

 

Causal Rewrite- jsoccer5

Do you know what is in that?

Childhood obesity is one of the country’s biggest health problems of the 21st Century and there is truly no cure. In an article produced by the American Society for Nutrition they discuss how obesity is the result of interactions between factors such as genetics, cultures, environments, socioeconomic status and behaviors. These factors are the reasons why people eat what they eat and more specifically is the consumption of sugar.  For most Americans the main source of added sugar consumption comes from their intake of sugary drinks. This unfortunately makes sugary drinks one of the leading causes of childhood obesity.

Sugary drinks are sold everywhere from convenient stores to school vending machines and this exposes children to the constant access and ability to consume. Due to this exposure of drinks like Gatorade and Coke these beverages are being consumed more and more every day. Based on an article written by Roderick McKinley, the average American consumes 1.6 cans of soda a day resulting in the consumption of more than 500 cans of soda in one year. Think about the one 12 ounce can of Coca-Cola, that can of soda contains 39 grams of sugar. According to an article published by Sugar Science, the average amount of added sugar a child should consume in one day is 18.5 grams however this may vary based on age, but should never be more than 25 grams a day. If a child consumes just one can of Coca-Cola a day they have already doubled their sugar intake for the day. The most concerning aspect are the calories being consumed by drinking these beverages. The U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend the total intake of discretional calories, including sugars and fats, should range between 5-15% per day, yet most American children consume about 16% of their intake from added sugars alone, not including fats or any other foods. Many Americans are shocked to learn these statistics. They don’t always understand where these added sugars are coming from and do not seem to realize they come from the drinks they are consuming.

These sugary drinks are often consumed without much thought into the fact that the person consuming the beverage is drinking large amounts of sugar while at the same time they are consuming a large percentage of their daily calories; not to mention doing so quickly. The problem is that many people consume more of this than their body needs. According to an advice column published by the Arch Pediatric Medical Journal, these drinks are consumed before the body has time to realize it is full, in the same way a body would when eating solid food.  The World Health Organization adds to this by stating “these drinks have little nutritional value and do not provide the same feeling of fullness as solid food does, making it so they continue to consume more even though their body has had enough.” As people continue to consume these beverages they begin to exceed the amount of sugar their body needs to produce energy.  Because of the over consumption the body breaks down only what it needs for energy and the rest is stored as fat. After many years of consuming too much sugar and the body continuing to turn the excess into fat, the fat continues to add up ultimately resulting in the person becoming obese. In a study conducted by the American College of Nutrition, they found that “Obese children consume significantly more servings of fats and sugary beverages than non-obese children in a study done between the two groups.” This study, along with many others of a similar nature, have helped to prove the direct correlation between obesity and sugary drinks and how this has affected the nationwide epidemic.

Childhood Obesity may never be cured due to the many different causes. The CDC currently states that childhood obesity affects about 12.7 million children. This statistic could be reduced if sugary drink consumption goes down as well. If parents become more educated and adopt healthy habits themselves, such as cutting back intake of soda, they will begin to influence their children and the children around them to do the same. There is hope that in future generations, obesity rates will decline as a result of parents educating themselves on this issue. As those children become parents, their knowledge on this topic will be extensive and they will be able to provide the healthiest nutritional options for their future children.

Work Cited

Childhood Obesity Facts.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 17 Nov. 2016. Web. 30 Nov. 2016

Gillis, Linda J., and Oded Bar-Or. “Food away from home, sugar-sweetened drink consumption and juvenile obesity.” Journal of the American College of Nutrition 22.6 (2003): 539-545.

Johnson. “How much is too much?” Research. SugarScience.org, 30 Mar. 2014. Web. 5 Dec. 2016.

Malik, Vasanti S., Matthias B. Schulze, and Frank B. Hu. “Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain: a systematic review.” The American journal of clinical nutrition 84.2 (2006): 274-288.

McKinlay, Rodrick D. “Obesity Action Coalition » Childhood Obesity: The Link to Drinks.” Childhood Obesity: The Link to Drinks Comments. Obesity Action Coalition, n.d. Web. 04 Dec. 2016.

 “Reducing Consumption of Sugar-sweetened Beverages to Reduce the Risk of Childhood Overweight and Obesity.” Reducing Consumption of Sugar-sweetened Beverages to Reduce the Risk of Childhood Overweight and Obesity. World Health Organization, 24 Aug. 2016. Web. 04 Dec. 2016.

Sugary Drinks and Childhood Obesity. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009;163(4):400. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.16

Causal Argument- jsoccer5

Do you know what is in that?

Childhood obesity is one the countries biggest health problems right now, and there is really no cure. In an article produced by the American Society for Nutrition they discuss how obesity is the reflection of the interactions of different factors such as, genetics, cultures, environments, socioeconomic status and behaviors. These factors are play a role in the reasons why people eat what they eat, specifically the consumption of sugar. For most Americans their main source of added sugars comes from their intake of sugary drinks. Consumption of these sugary drinks are incredibly high and is linked to being one of the leading causes in childhood obesity nationwide.

Sugary drinks are available everywhere from stores to schools to vending machines, making it nearly impossible for children not to get their hands on it. Due to easy access to sugar drinks such as cola, the consumption of these drinks sky rocket. In an article written by Roderick McKinley he states that the average American consumes 1.6 cans of soda a day, resulting in them consuming more than 500 cans of soda in one year. Think about one 12 ounce can of Coca-Cola. That can contains 39 grams of sugar. According to an article published by Sugar Science “the average amount of added sugar a child should consume in one day is 18.5 grams,  however this may vary based on age but will never be more than 25 grams.” If a child consumes just one can of Coca-Cola a day they have already doubled their sugar intake for the day. What is most concerning is that the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend “the total intake of discretional calories, including sugars and fats, should range between 5-15% per day, yet most American children consume about 16% of their intake from added sugars alone.” While many Americans are shocked to find out these statistics they also don’t always understand where these added sugars are coming from, and do not seem to realize that they come from the drinks they are consuming.

These sugary drinks are often consumed without much thought into the fact that the person consuming the drink is drinking large amounts of sugar as well as drinking a large percentage of calories and doing so very quickly. What becomes the problem is that many people consume more of this than their body needs and in an advice column published by the Arch Pediatric Medical Journal they state that these drinks are all consumed before a person’s body can realize they have consumed it as well as before the body has time to realize it is full the same way a body would when eating solid food.  The World Health Organization also adds to this by stating “these drinks have little nutritional value and do not provide the same feeling of fullness as solid food does,” making it so they continue to consume more even though their body has had enough. The more people consume sugary drinks the less their body breaks it down for energy resulting in it becoming fat, and over many years of doing this after, especially after starting at a young age, the fat continues to add up ultimately resulting in the person becoming obese. In a study conducted by the American College of Nutrition they found that “Obese children consume significantly more servings of fats and sugary beverages than non-obese children,” proving that the correlation between obesity and sugary drinks is in fact a direct cause to this nationwide epidemic.

Childhood Obesity may never be cured as it has some many different causes, however it can be reduced. The CDC currently states that childhood obesity affects about 12.7 million children. This amount of children could be reduced if the reduction of sugary drink consumption goes down as well. While it will not reduce the consumption of sugary drinks and its affects on childhood obesity by a lot, if parents become more educated and adopt healthy habits themselves, such as cutting back intake of soda, they will begin to influence their children and the children around them to do the same. As these educated parents, influence their children there is hope that in future generations obesity declines and is only a small percentage of the united states as those children will be able to provide the healthiest nutritional options for their future children.

Work Cited

Childhood Obesity Facts.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 17 Nov. 2016. Web. 30 Nov. 2016

Gillis, Linda J., and Oded Bar-Or. “Food away from home, sugar-sweetened drink consumption and juvenile obesity.” Journal of the American College of Nutrition 22.6 (2003): 539-545.

Johnson. “How much is too much?” Research. SugarScience.org, 30 Mar. 2014. Web. 5 Dec. 2016.

Malik, Vasanti S., Matthias B. Schulze, and Frank B. Hu. “Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain: a systematic review.” The American journal of clinical nutrition 84.2 (2006): 274-288.

McKinlay, Rodrick D. “Obesity Action Coalition » Childhood Obesity: The Link to Drinks.” Childhood Obesity: The Link to Drinks Comments. Obesity Action Coalition, n.d. Web. 04 Dec. 2016.

Reducing Consumption of Sugar-sweetened Beverages to Reduce the Risk of Childhood Overweight and Obesity.” Reducing Consumption of Sugar-sweetened Beverages to Reduce the Risk of Childhood Overweight and Obesity. World Health Organization, 24 Aug. 2016. Web. 04 Dec. 2016.

Sugary Drinks and Childhood Obesity. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009;163(4):400. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.16

Bibliography-Jsoccer5

Annotated Bibliography

1.Boles, Myde, et al. “Ability of a mass media campaign to influence knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors about sugary drinks and obesity.” Preventive medicine 67 (2014): S40-S45.

Background: This article discusses the relationship media has with the way people act. The article shows that when the media shows a group of people how bad sugary drinks are they become more informed and then change behaviors. In this specific study they talk about a study done in Oregon where they informed people about how bad sugary drinks are for you and how this campaign helped the people in the area become more knowledgeable and how a large portion of these people stated they would change their ways.

How I used It: I used this source in my research paper to help show how mass media campaigns like the one in this article can be used to educate Americans on the affects sugary drinks have on their health.

2.Cespedes, Andrea. “Benefits of Sports Drinks Like Gatorade and Powerade.” Leaf Group, 09 June 2015. Web. 04 Dec. 2016

Background: This article talks about the positive benefits of sports drinks. The author discusses the benefits of electrolytes, carbohydrates and when is a good time to drink these beverages. The article offers vague information and leaves the reader to interpret alot.

How I used It: I used this article in my rebuttal argument as well as my research paper to help prove the point that Americans are lead to believe certain things because of the vagueness associated with different health claims.

3.Childhood Obesity Causes & Consequences.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 19 June 2015. Web. 30 Nov. 2016.

Background: This article talks about the influence community involvement has on societies behaviors and how that impacts childhood obesity. When it comes to the community’s involvement a lot of causes are based around food. At the end of the article it discusses health risks of childhood obesity.

How I used it: I used this article to show a fact about how many children consume sugary drinks in my definitional argument. I used one of the overwhelming statistics on sugary drinks to help show that sugary drinks are a problem but lacks the complete definition of a sugary drink.

4.Childhood Obesity Facts.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 17 Nov. 2016. Web. 30 Nov. 2016

Background: The Center for Disease Control released statistics based on Childhood Obesity in 2011-2014.

Facts from the CDC

  • The prevalence of obesity has remained fairly stable at about 17% and affects about 12.7 million children and adolescents.
  • Overall obesity prevalence among children whose adult head of household completed college was approximately half that of those whose adult head of household did not complete high school (9% vs 19% among girls; 11% vs 21% among boys) in 1999–2010.
  • Obesity prevalence was the highest among children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 100% or less (household income that is at or below the poverty threshold), followed by those in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 101%–130%, and then found to be lower in children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 131% or larger (greater household income).

How I used it: I used this article in my causal argument and research paper to help readers see how many people are affected by childhood obesity.

5.Gillis, Linda J., and Oded Bar-Or. “Food away from home, sugar-sweetened drink consumption and juvenile obesity.” Journal of the American College of Nutrition22.6 (2003): 539-545.

Background: This article discusses the relationship between people’s diets and their weight. They complete a study in which they found that obese children consume more meat, grains, sugary drinks, and processed food, while also lacking fruits and vegetables in everyday diets. It also talks about the effects that eating out has on the food consumption of children.

How I used it: I used this article to help support the direct correlation between obesity and sugary drink intake based on their study.

6.Go, A. S., D. Mozaffarian, and V. L. Roger. “Sugar-sweetened beverages initiatives can help fight childhood obesity.” circulation 127 (2013): e6-e245.

Background: This article discusses an option for lowering sugary drink consumption by taxing it and shows how it will also help the economy. They also define sugary drinks into types of beverages and talk a little bit about why it is so bad for you.

How I Used it: I used this cite to add onto my definition for my definitional argument and research paper.

7.Harris, Jennifer L., et al. “Evaluating Sugary Drink Nutrition and Marketing to Youth.” New Haven, CT: Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity (2011).

Background: This article discusses childhood obesities direct link to sugary drinks and how many of these companies promote this unhealthy life style. While providing general accurate statements it also provides a great deal of statistics to support the fact that sugary drinks are bad for children and yet market directly to them.

How I Used it: I used this article in my Definitional argument to help my argument that it’s hard to determine what is considered good for you and bad for you due to the positive health claims. Unfortunately the claims aren’t always what they seem. I also used it in my definitional argument to help my reader understand why sugary drinks are so bad for people but especially children.

8.Johnson. “How much is too much?” Research. SugarScience.org, 30 Mar. 2014. Web. 5 Dec. 2016.

Background:  In this article they discuss the concern for how much sugar Americans intake against what Americans are actually consuming using lots of facts and statistics.

How I used it: I used this article in my causal argument to help readers see how much sugar should be consumed against how much is actually being consumed.

9. Lynch, Barbara S., and Richard J. Bonnie. “Youth access to tobacco products.” (1994).

Background: This article discusses the usage of tobacco products, especially after the nationwide age restriction.

How I used it: I used this paper to help support my thesis and to prove that by adding an age limitation on the purchase of tobacco the amount of underage smokers went down, therefore the same would happen if America put an age restriction on sugar beverages.

10.Malik, Vasanti S., Matthias B. Schulze, and Frank B. Hu. “Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain: a systematic review.” The American journal of clinical nutrition84.2 (2006): 274-288.

Background: This article takes an in depth look at the correlation of sugary drinks and weight gain. The review uses different investigations and studies to come to the conclusion that the intake of sugary beverages are in conjunction with weight gain and obesity in children and adults. It explains that theses beverages also provide little nutritional value and result in incomplete compensation of energy at subsequent meals. Ultimately the conclusion of the article is that these drinks should be discouraged and there needs to be more efforts to promote consumption of healthier beverages.

How I Used it: I used this article in my Causal argument to explain the different factors that play a role in obesity as well as sugary drink consumption.

11.McKinlay, Rodrick D. “Obesity Action Coalition » Childhood Obesity: The Link to Drinks.” Childhood Obesity: The Link to Drinks Comments. Obesity Action Coalition, n.d. Web. 04 Dec. 2016.

Background: This article talks about the effect sugary drinks have on childhood obesity. It discusses how much is consumed and the effect caffeine has as well. It ends by talking about parents roles on changing this problem by adapting a healthier lifestyle as well to role model how to be healthier for the children.

How I used It: I used this article in my causal argument when explaining how much soda is consumed by Americans and how American can start to slowly change this worldwide problem.

12.Ogden, Cynthia . Consumption of Sugar Drinks in the US (2005-2008), et al. . US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 2011.

Background: This article discusses the consumption in kilocalories and the differences of consumption based on age, race, ethnicity, income and location. It also explains how much is consumed and gives a definition for sugary drinks.

How I Used it: I used this article in my definitional argument as it had a very accurate and comprehensible definition to help guide my explanation of what a sugary drink is.

13.”Reducing Consumption of Sugar-sweetened Beverages to Reduce the Risk of Childhood Overweight and Obesity.” Reducing Consumption of Sugar-sweetened Beverages to Reduce the Risk of Childhood Overweight and Obesity. World Health Organization, 24 Aug. 2016. Web. 04 Dec. 2016.

Background: The World Health Organization talks about how sugary drinks are directly linked to obesity. Consumption of these beverages is incredibly high and suggest poor diets. They offer suggestions on how much sugar should be consumed to be considered healthy.

How I used It: I used this article in my causal argument to show proof that sugary drinks are not nutritional and do not help one feel full.

14.Sugary Drinks and Childhood Obesity. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009;163(4):400. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.16

Background: This article discusses how sugary drinks can lead to childhood obesity as well as other diseases. It gives examples of what sugary drinks are and breaks it down into four categories. The article goes over the factors that contribute to this and how they contribute to the cause of other diseases.

How I Used it: I used this article in my definitional argument to provide proof of types and examples of sugary drinks. I also used this article in my causal argument to explain how the body reacts when it has taken in too much sugar at one time.

 

 

 

Definition Rewrite- jsoccer5

Sugary Drinks are Everywhere

Childhood obesity is a nationwide epidemic throughout the United States. While there are many leading factors when it comes to what causes childhood obesity one of the largest causes is from the consumption of sugary drinks. According to the CDC, “80% of youths consume sugar sweetened beverages,” but what they do not mention is what exactly a sugary drink consists of. This poses the question for readers of what is a sugary drink.

For most people when the thought of sugary drinks comes to mind the thought of soda and energy drinks are what constitutes ‘a sugary drink’ however it is actually so much more. According to the National Cancer Center, “sugary drinks consist of fruit drinks, soda, energy drinks, sport drinks and sweetened waters.”  The American Heart Association also gives a list of what is included in sugary drinks including sweetened teas to the list as well. In the Advice for Patients section of the Arch Pediatric Medical Journal, they give examples of some of the types of sugar drinks and examples to go with it. For the type of drink classified under fruitades they gave examples such as Gatorade and lemonade, for fruit juices they give examples like Kool-Aid and fruit punch, for soda they give the example of Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and for energy drinks they give the examples of Monster or Red Bull.  The drinks mentioned above are a lot of times considered to be healthy or good for you, and are in many American homes. The problem is that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in a youth’s diet and also the main source of calorie intake. What this means is that when a child drinks a soda they are taking in a lot of calories at one time, often more than a body needs which then is not processed and becomes fat.

The largest problem that Americans are faced with is determining if a drink is considered bad for you. Most Americans do not even think to look at the nutritional label when purchasing beverages, as the companies producing these sugary drinks attach positive health claims to the products to hide the fact that these drinks are packed with sugar. One of the most commonly purchased sports drinks is Gatorade. On the Gatorade label it has the word ‘Performance’ in large print as well as the phrases, “thirst quencher and natural flavors”. Gatorade is also known as an electrolyte sports drink, where it is supposed to replace lost electrolytes, however the proper sodium to potassium ratio for replacing electrolytes is a 1 to 1 ratio and Gatorade consists of 250mg of sodium and 65mg of potassium per 20oz bottle making it so that you are not even able to replenish electrolytes. Kids also see many different famous athletes supporting these products and families are lead to assume that this is a good product for their child. What they don’t know is that Gatorade is packed with 35 grams of sugar in a 20oz bottle. Just think 35 grams of sugar is equal to 8.75 teaspoons of sugar and that’s a lot of sugar in a bottle.

While there are many different types of drinks out there, they can almost always be classified as sugary or not. As a country we need to identify these drinks and start to eliminate them from our children’s diets. In efforts to change our children’s diets we also need to be educating everyone around us in order to prevent the childhood obesity epidemic from getting worse.

Work Cited

Childhood Obesity Causes & Consequences.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 19 June 2015. Web. 30 Nov. 2016.

Go, A. S., D. Mozaffarian, and V. L. Roger. “Sugar-sweetened beverages initiatives can help fight childhood obesity.” circulation 127 (2013): e6-e245.

Harris, Jennifer L., et al. “Evaluating Sugary Drink Nutrition and Marketing to Youth.” New Haven, CT: Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity (2011).

Ogden, Cynthia . Consumption of Sugar Drinks in the US (2005-2008), et al. . US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 2011.

Sugary Drinks and Childhood Obesity. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009;163(4):400. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.16

 

Definitional Argument- Jsoccer5

Did you know that your drink maybe packed with sugar?

Childhood obesity is a nationwide epidemic throughout the United States. While there are many leading factors when it comes to what causes Childhood obesity one of the largest causes is from the consumption of sugary drinks. According to the CDC, “80% of youth consume sugar sweetened beverages,” but what they do not mention is what exactly a sugary drink consists of, posing the question for readers of what is a sugary drink ?

For most people when the thought of sugary drinks comes to mind the though of soda and energy drinks are what constitutes as a sugar drink, however it is actually so much more. According to the National Cancer Center sugary drinks consist of fruit drinks, soda, energy drinks, sport drinks, and sweetened waters (Ogden, 5). The American Heart Association also gives a list of what is included in sugary drinks, including sweetened teas to the list as well (Go, 1). aid, Soda such as Coke, and Energy Drinks such as Monster or Red Bull. Sugary Drinks are the largest source of added sugars in a youth’s diet and also the main source of calorie intake (Harris, 2). What this means is that when a child drinks a soda they are taking in a lot of calories at one time, often more than a body needs which then is not processed properly and becomes fat.

The largest problem that Americans face with determining if a drink is considered bad for you before even looking to see the sugar content is due to the fact that many sugary drinks have positive health claims attached to help hide the fact that they are packed with sugar (Harris, 2). One of the most common poor drink purchases are sports drinks, such as Gatorade. On the Gatorade label it has the word Performance in large print as well as the phrases thirst quencher and natural flavors. Gatorade is also know as an electrolyte sports drink, and kids see many different athletes supporting these products families are lead to assume this is good for their child. What they don’t know is that Gatorade is packed with 35 grams of sugar in a 20oz bottle. Just think 35 grams of sugar is equal to 8.75 teaspoons of sugar, and that’s a lot of sugar in a bottle.

While there is many different types of drinks out there, they can almost always be classified as sugary or not. By making people more aware of what is bad for children, families will be able to make more informed choices when shopping for beverages and hopefully that will help with the childhood obesity epidemic that sweeps our country.

 

Work Cited

“Childhood Obesity Causes & Consequences.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 19 June 2015. Web. 30 Nov. 2016.

Go, A. S., D. Mozaffarian, and V. L. Roger. “Sugar-sweetened beverages initiatives can help fight childhood obesity.” circulation 127 (2013): e6-e245.

Harris, Jennifer L., et al. “Evaluating sugary drink nutrition and marketing to youth.” New Haven, CT: Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity (2011).

Ogden, Cynthia L., et al. Consumption of sugar drinks in the United States, 2005-2008. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 2011.

Sugary Drinks and Childhood Obesity. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009;163(4):400. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.16