Bibliography – anonymous

 1.  Egan, Timothy. “Old, Ailing and Finally a Burden Abandoned.” The New York Times. The New York Times, 25 Mar. 1992. Web. 07 Dec. 2016.

Background: This article highlights the side of Alzheimer’s that doesn’t come to mind for most. When the struggle of taking care of a family member with AD becomes too much many resort to this.

How I used it: I used this article to really bring my thesis to a solid foundation. Within this article I was able to draw out personal stories that really hit home as to just how serious this disease is.

2. “Alzheimer’s Disease & Dementia.” Alzheimer’s Disease & Dementia. N.p., 07 Dec. 2016. Web. 07 Dec. 2016.

Background: Not many people even know the basics of Alzheimer’s. Establishing this website is crucial for not only my reader and I but it also helps the world.

How I used it: This was a website post that gave me the basic foundation I needed to accurately describe the fundamentals of what Alzheimer’s is and how it effects your body.

3. “Stages of Alzheimer’s & Symptoms.” Stages of Alzheimer’s & Symptoms. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Dec. 2016.

Background: This web article addressed in more detail the steps and stages Alzheimer’s can take during its progression.

How I used it: I used this piece of material to further my readers understanding on AD.

4. Rebecca Ley for the Daily Mail. “Why DO so Many Children Abandon Parents in Their Darkest Hour?” Daily Mail Online. Associated Newspapers, 28 May 2014. Web. 13 Dec. 2016.

Background: This was an article that I needed to use to touch on the emotional side of the reader. I reached out to get some empathy from my reader and give my paper a humanistic approach.

How I used it:

 5. Mayo Clinic Staff Print. “Alzheimer’s Disease.” Treatment – Alzheimer’s Disease. N.p., 22 Dec. 2015. Web. 13 Dec. 2016.

Background:

How I used it:

6. “Alzheimer’s Statistics.” Alzheimers.net. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2016.

Background: This was purely a website to provide my research paper with legitimate statistics regarding AD in modern America.

How I used it: I used these statistics to further my point in my sub-topic of why AD sufferers need programs that provide them with advanced care and treatment. Some statistics such as 1 in 9 Americans over the age of 65 have some form of dementia was staggering to hear.

 7. “Midlife Vascular Risk Factors and Alzheimer’s Disease in Later Life: Longitudinal, Population Based Study.” Midlife Vascular Risk Factors and Alzheimer’s Disease in Later Life. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2016.

Background:

How I used it:

8. “Learning How Little We Know About the Brain.” The NewYork Times. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2016.

Background: This article highlighted just how little we really know about the thing that controls our every thought emotion or feeling. The brain is said to be less explored than even space, with this much room for research its hard to say we will ever find a cure.

How I used it: I used it to expose the truth that Alzheimer’s is a disease that effects the brain, the most complex organ we have, and a cure will take years and years of work. I counterintuitively used this argument to actually help aid my position that patients with AD need treatments that are available now.

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