Definition rewrite -jdormann

Can Serious Head Injuries be Prevented in American Football?

There have been many lives that have been altered forever, or even ended because of concussions or spinal injuries due to playing football. When a person plays a high impact sport, their chances of a life changing injury dramatically increases. Repetitive concussions have been proved to cause CTE, chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Football is a popular sport across America, and research on brain damage from playing continues to prove the dangers it has to players health.

Certain teams and players have adopted techniques that reduce the chances of serious head injuries. The professional football league has bean implementing new rules that keep players safer. The risk of concussions and serious injury are prevalent in full contact sports, but other sports do not have the same life-altering injury rate as football.

When watching a football game, at any level, spectators can expect to see powerful hits that radiate through the athlete’s head and spine. The high energy hits are thrilling for both the fans and athletes, but cumulative hits cause serious damage to the players health. NFL players are the highest level football players in the world, and they are the ones that receive the highest number of head injuries that cause the most damage. Such a large organization would surely have some knowledge and capabilities to prevent these injuries, but the league decided to brush the known complications under the rug, until recently. The families of players and fans became furious about the ignorance of the league and turned to the law for justice. The NFL has been taken to court with over 4,000 lawsuits from players and their families because of concussions and CTE. CTE is a disease that slowly kills brain cells and can completely alter someones mental state and thought process. It has caused increased aggression, dementia, anxiety, depression, and more.

As more people became aware of the dangers, they were less likely to support the game or allow their developing children to play. If there is a way to prevent or entirely eliminate concussions, people would feel more comfortable with allowing their children to play football. Teams like the Seattle Seahawks have adopted this rugby style of tackling and it has improved player safety and tackling efficiency. The different tackling technique may not be accepted by all teams, but the game will eventually have to do something about the head injury epidemic. An article published by The Telegraph states:

Several American colleges have studied this way of tackling. The Seattle Seahawks have worked with Fijian rugby sevens star Waisale Serevi on “taking the head out of the game”. Rugby techniques have subsequently been introduced at Washington, Florida and Michigan State – whose head coach Mark Dantonio extols the benefits of rugby–style tackling.

This type of tackling emphasizes player safety and not allowing the head to be put in danger during contact. Rugby players do not wear padding or helmets, so tackling must be controlled and properly executed. The players must be cognizant of their body position and in complete control of the tackling movement. Rugby does have concussions, but it is typically from bad tackling technique. Safety of the player being tackled is also of high importance. There are rules in the game that do not allow unsafe tackles. If a tackler is to spear, tackle above the runners shoulders, tackle a player without the ball, or lift the player from the ground, the result will be at least a yellow card removing them from the game and possibly a multiple game suspension.

The way that football players tackle is careless and does not usually follow a specific technique. Players will throw their body into a tackle because their padding gives them a false sense of security. The head is not protected and there is not enough absorption of energy to protect the athlete’s brain. Young athletes are taught some techniques, but proper technique often gets thrown out the window during play. Studies have proven that playing football at a young age increases the risk of brain damage tremendously. Boston ~University conducted research on the damage that football has on developing players. In an article by the Washington Post they wrote, “Those who started playing contact football before the age of 12 suffered more behavioral, cognitive and emotional problems than those who started playing after they turned 12.” This is hard evidence of the detrimental issues football can have on young players. Society needs to be careful about allowing young athletes to participate in football. Children do not fully understand how playing a sport can  affect them in the long term. All football players are susceptible to serious brain injuries, but children are much more vulnerable to these life-altering injuries.

When using proper technique, athletes executing a tackle will make contact with the shoulder and drive through the opponent. Intense impact on the shoulder and neck are can cause a stinger. A stinger occurs when the neck is pushed to the side and the main nerve from the brain to the arm is pinched. This can cause the sensation of an electric shock or burning/stinging. Although a majority of the time this injury resolves between hours to days, it can become frequently occurring and could become a lifelong injury. In an article about stingers and the possible health hazards by Alexa Royston and Lindsay Ramey, it reads,”Terminal stingers/burners are characterized by severe neurotmetic injuries, where incomplete reinnervation may lead to permanent weakness and atrophy.” Motor weakness, loss of muscle, and paresthesia occur in extreme stinger cases. There is a number of rugby players that have had stingers, but the statistics are far less than football. The probability of stingers and nerve damage increase when the tackler and runner are playing with the false sense of security that padding gives them. When players continue to participate despite their injuries, they put themselves and others at higher risk because their technique deteriorates.

People that do not support football could argue that players accept the risk of serious injury upon participating in football, but walking away with a life debilitating injury is not a thought for any of players. A high contact, high impact sport that risks permanent injury to the brain, spine, and skeletal muscle system needs to support safer rules and techniques instead of pushing players to create bigger and harder hits.

References

Tmg. “Is Rugby or American Football More Dangerous?” The Telegraph, Telegraph Media Group, 25 Jan. 2016, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/film/concussion/is-rugby-or-american-football-more-dangerous/.

Royston, A., & Ramey, L. (2013, September 20). Stingers and Burners. Retrieved March 20, 2018, from https://now.aapmr.org/stingers-and-burners/

Wilkerson, R. (n.d.). Our knowledge of orthopaedics. Your best health. (S. J. Fischer, Ed.). Retrieved March 20, 2018, from https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases–conditions/burners-and-stingers/

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4 Responses to Definition rewrite -jdormann

  1. davidbdale says:

    I find a WHOLE LOT to like about your rewrite, JD. Your description of the rugby tackle, your comparisons between rugby and football techniques, your implication that the NFL advocates dangerous contact to the detriment of their players . . . and more . . . make this the most material- and evidence-filled version of your argument so far.

    It’s also an organizational mess.
    And it needs an overhaul rhetorically.

    But, wow, you’re building a case here, engaging your audience, taking the argument seriously. You have my attention. Do you want to get started on revisions?

    Rank these in order of importance to you (1)(2)(3):
    —Paragraph organization
    —Robust subjects and verbs
    —Rhetorical techniques

    I’m ready when you are. Reply with a priority order and put this post back into Feedback Please.

    Like

    • jdormann says:

      Thank you. I feel that paragraph organization should be first, then rhetorical techniques, and robust subjects and verbs would be third for me. I appreciate the feedback and hope to hear more soon.

      Like

  2. davidbdale says:

    To demonstrate how often and quickly you shift from one theme to another, JD, I have color-coded your text. I hope the shifts in subject matter are apparent. Ideally, your work should develop a theme, transition to the next, and not return to the original repeatedly.

    If seeing your work in this way helps you reorganize to more logical flow, I won’t belabor the point any further. But if you want advice on how to cluster your material and reduce the number of transitions, I’d be happy to work with you on that as well.

    Is this helpful so far?

    Like

  3. jdormann says:

    I found this feedback to be helpful and will make the appropriate changes. Thanks.

    Like

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