Proposal+5—Killroy513

*** I need to find a few book sources***

 

Topic: Prohibition.

Thesis: The Prohibition was started to outlaw alcohol but boosted illegal activity helping to create the sport of NASCAR.

My topic is not one of the average topics listed by my peers. The topic is about how during the American Prohibition, the outlaw of alcohol was in place, it was impossible to get any kind of liquor or beer. This would boost illegal activity from gangs forming in the major cities, to alcohol runners. The Alcohol runners were men that smuggled alcohol in modified cars that could max the speed limit. These cars were built to run from the cops.

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2012/aug/26/lawless-prohibition-gangsters-speakeasies

This source indicates how the laws set in place for the legalization of alcohol did not work. It explains how gangsters became popular and how more illegal activity had commenced. It goes from the beginning of the amendment to its end.

It proves that illegal activities increased when the laws were enacted. These gangsters would run cities. The most well known of the gangsters was Al Capone. He owned Chicago.

https://www.carkeys.co.uk/news/the-story-of-how-moonshiners-created-the-performance-car

This source explains how alcohol smugglers would modify their cars so they can outrun the police. Basically this is how the performance cars were first created and how science and skill perfected these cars.

It proves that the prohibition had a mark on modified cars and sparked the interest of a whole new movement. This movement would age into one of Americas coolest sports, NASCAR.

http://theroaringtwentieshistory.blogspot.com/2010/06/prohibition-and-speakeasies.html

This source shows that illegal activity boosted with these laws in place. The links talks about how secret bars were created in towns and cities so that the people could still drink. Passwords and other forms of identification were used to keep the bars running. Music and liquor was the most important part of these bars. In big cities many gangsters created these bars and generated a ton of money from them.

This proves that the laws did not really work and boosted the illegal business of U.S. citizens. Many broke the law because it ruined the lives of small town business but also helped make many very wealthy.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/during-prohibition-your-doctor-could-write-you-prescription-booze-180947940/

This source explains how doctors during the prohibition would break the rules and proscribe their patients with alcohol. The source indicates that many doctors would prescribe people with this so they could get alcohol. This in turn would be illegal.

This proves that the medical profession also was against the law and broke the law.

http://prohibitionincanada.blogspot.com/p/smuggling-bootegging-and-something.html

This source shows that a lot of the alcohol that was used in the United States was bootlegged from Canada. The modified cars were used to smuggled these drinks over the border in the winter time. These men would drive over the lakes to make a profit. ships were also used as well. Many shipments were hidden.

This proves that other nations benefited off the law that lasted an era. People would break the law and commit illegal acts to make a profit. Business was good, and the rick was worth the reward. These cars were the great grandfathers to today’s NASCAR cars.

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2 Responses to Proposal+5—Killroy513

  1. davidbdale says:

    You have an intriguing story line here, Killroy. I’ll follow its development with interest. Before I examine your sources, let me offer some suggestions about language in your Introduction.

    1. My topic is not one of the average topics listed by my peers. 2. The topic is about how during the American Prohibition, the outlaw of alcohol was in place, it was impossible to get any kind of liquor or beer. 3. This would boost illegal activity from gangs forming in the major cities, to alcohol runners. 4. The Alcohol runners were men that smuggled alcohol in modified cars that could max the speed limit. 5. These cars were built to run from the cops.

    1. Your first sentence may be true, but it’s probably not good politics to critique your classmates needlessly.
    2. Your second sentence makes a mistake I see you’ve made several times in this post. Unless you really mean to discuss the process of HOW something occurs, it’s misleading to use how as you use it here. The sentence is also an illegal comma splice. Your last clause, “It was impossible to get any kind of liquor or beer,” is a sentence by itself, so the comma before it is not sufficient punctuation.
    3. I had to read the sentence three times to realize you meant From This To That. Boosting activity from one group to another made no sense.
    4. To Max the speed limit would be to drive AT the speed limit. You mean the cars could exceed the speed limit. But most cars usually can.
    5. So drive home the point that cars designed to evade cops were later used recreationally in races that developed into the NASCAR circuit.
    Maybe:

    During the American Prohibition, which outlawed alcohol production, sales, and consumption in the US, it was impossible to get any kind of liquor or beer legally. But prohibition did nothing to reduce demand, so gangs formed in major cities to traffic in bootleg booze, and alcohol runners smuggled their contraband in modified cars that could blow through speed limits in their lower gears. These cars that were built to run from the cops had an instant appeal for rebels who chafed at the government’s moralistic new laws. They remained popular after the repeal of Prohibition, when their owners started racing them, first in unsanctioned drag races on country roads, eventually on race tracks that became the sites for NASCAR events.

    You’re proposing to relate a narrative, Killroy, so work on a style that will provide your readers with the details that flesh out the motivations of the characters. Clarify for readers that liquor was still available, but that to make or buy it was illegal. This made most adult Americans into criminals. Consequently, anyone who wanted a drink had to consort with criminals, engage in criminal activity, and of course sympathize with criminality. What’s a speed limit compared to all of that? Get a little drama into your Us vs Them story. The elements are all there. And if you can trace other threads of rebellion, resistance, anti-authoritarianism into the early days of NASCAR, I suggest you weave them into your narrative as well.

    If that’s at all helpful, consider making revisions to this post as a way to begin the process of writing your essay. The more time you spend describing the value of these sources to your argument, the sooner you’ll begin to develop your thinking on the themes of your paper.

    Ask for another round of feedback when you’ve made your revisions.

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  2. davidbdale says:

    Regarding books, a very quick-and-dirty Google search for Rum Runner NASCAR led me in one step to a Wikipedia post about Roy Hall. In the Sources for that post were these books:
    —Dabney, Joseph Earl (1980). More Mountain Spirits. Fairview, NC: Bright Mountain Books. ISBN 978-0914875031.
    —Fielden, Greg (2003). NASCAR Chronicle. Lincolnwood, IL: Publications International, Ltd. ISBN 0-7853-9745-0.
    —Lazarus, William P. (2004). The Sands of Time: Celebrating 100 Years of Racing at Daytona. Champaign, IL: Sports Publishing LLC. ISBN 978-1582617848.
    —Pierce, Daniel S. (2010). Real NASCAR: White Lightning, Red Clay, and Big Bill France. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press. ISBN 978-0807833841.
    —Thompson, Neal (2006). Driving with the Devil: Southern Moonshine, Detroit Wheels, and the Birth of NASCAR. New York: Crown Publishers. ISBN 978-1-4000-8225-4.

    They all show promise, but check out that Thompson book. “Moonshine . . . and the Birth of NASCAR.”

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